5 Signs of Gingivitis in Kids That Every Parent Should Never Ignore

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Gingivitis, also called gum disease, is the most common and mildest form of periodontal disease. Gingivitis is caused by too much plaque build-up in the gums. Gingivitis is very common in children. If not properly removed through brushing, it will irritate and eventually infect the gums. But if detected early enough, a pediatric dentist can treat and help reverse the effects of gingivitis.

Gingivitis can be prevented with proper and regular brushing, flossing, and dental cleaning. On the other hand, if left untreated, gingivitis can become a more serious form of periodontal disease.

We believe in the saying “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”. And as mentioned, early diagnosis is important in the treatment of gingivitis. That is why we have listed 5 common signs of gingivitis that you should look out for in your kids, particularly when they brush their teeth.

● Your child will have bright red and tender gums.

● Your child’s gums are bleeding when he or she brushes or flosses.

● Your child’s teeth are becoming looser and separating.

● Your child’s gums are receding away from the teeth.

● Your child has a bad breath.

Older children like teenagers are at greater risk of getting gingivitis. This is because when kids reach puberty, their hormonal level increases, creating a higher blood circulation to the gums. This causes the gums to be extra sensitive and can get easily irritated.

Establishing proper dental care is key to prevent your child from getting gingivitis. Establishing good and proper dental hygiene routine as early as possible will be helpful. As soon as the first tooth erupts, you can start brushing your child’s teeth and gums. And when your child reaches one, toothpaste can already be part of your child’s brushing routine. As your child grows and his or her teeth gaps close, make sure to start flossing too.

For older kids, you can allow your child to use antibacterial mouthwash too to take away hiding plaques and bacteria in the hard-to-reach areas of the mouth.

We encourage you to make brushing a family time too and be a good role model to your child by practicing proper and regular dental hygiene yourself.

Eating healthy, gum-friendly food is also another way to take care of your child’s teeth and gums. Making some slight changes in your child’s snacking can make a difference. For example, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests cheese, vegetables, and yogurt for snacking as healthier choices. As much as possible, lessen sweet and starchy foods such as potato chips, bread, and pretzels during meal times. Starches from these food feed the cavity-causing and gum-irritating bacteria that create plaque build-up in your child’s mouth.

Finally, do not forget to bring your child to his or her pediatric dentists every six months for oral exams and professional dental cleaning.

Sources:

Curing Gingivitis In Your Children, Colgate Https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/infant-kids/curing-gingivitis-in-your-children-1214

Gum Disease In Children, American Academy Of Periodontology Https://www.perio.org/consumer/gum-disease-and-children

Gingivitis Treatment: How To Treat Gingivitis At Home, Crest Https://crest.com/en-us/oral-health/gums/gingivitis-home-treatment

Is Gingivitis Contagious? MedicineNet.com Https://www.medicinenet.com/is_gingivitis_contagious/article.htm#is_gingivitis_contagious

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