Dental Hygiene for Preschoolers

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Your child’s well-being is your biggest concern, and their oral hygiene is part of their overall health.

As kids grow up, their dental hygiene should grow with them. Primary teeth are all present at the age of three, and though it does not stick for too long, taking care of them should also be a priority. After all, cavities and tooth decay develop when children are not abiding proper oral care.

Make oral hygiene fun by letting your children choose their toothbrush and flavor of toothpaste. Choose a toothpaste that is with fluoride as it makes teeth enamel stronger, better, and healthier. On the other hand, toothbrushes should be soft-bristled to avoid hurting those fragile gums.

Dentists advise that toothbrushes should be replaced every three months or when bristles are already worn out. More so, if your kids get sick, it is best to renew their toothbrush after feeling better to avoid bacteria getting into their system again. To prevent bacteria from accumulating in the toothbrush, allow it to air-dry. If your kids are using electric toothbrushes, guide them and avoid moving the brush in circles and keep your hands still.

At the age of three, your preschoolers can now use a pea-size amount of toothpaste instead of just using brush and water. It is best when you show your child how it’s done by brushing together. Teach your kids to brush up and down then left to right for two minutes. You can play their favorite song or set a timer to track the time of their brushing. Make sure that your kids spit their toothpaste and not swallow them even though minimal fluoride amounts are safe to be ingested.

Brushing and flossing are essential to keep teeth healthy. Brushing should be done at least twice daily. If your child eats something sweet or sugary, encourage them to rinse mouth and teeth with water. Flossing is another way to prevent cavity, keep gums healthy, and removes plaque. Start flossing when two teeth are right next to each other. While your kids are still preschoolers, pediatric dentists recommend that you floss your child’s teeth. It is also advised that you use the floss with holders for ease of use. When they are ready to floss on their own, guide your kids to floss until the gum line to remove any plaque or stuck food.

Diet can also affect your child’s oral health. The food that they eat supplies the nutrients to the body, including teeth and gums. Avoid giving your child foods that are high in sugar as it can stain teeth. Foods that are high in carbohydrates and starch significantly contribute to the production of plaque acids that attack tooth enamel. Encourage your child to have healthier options such as fruits and vegetables. Additionally, have them drink water after every meal not just to stay hydrated but also to wash off any food particle that can cause harm to their teeth.

Lastly, oral care is more than just brushing and flossing because your kids need some professional cleaning. Take your preschoolers to their pediatric dentist at least twice a year or every six months to keep their dental health in check.

We, at Kidsmile, are passionately dedicated to providing quality dental care for your child. Our goal is to partner with you to help your child establish and achieve excellent oral health.

You can message us here or via our social media accounts for an initial consultation or in booking your appointment.

Source:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/infant-kids/dental-hygiene-for-preschoolers-0513

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