Dental Trivia: If Only Toothbrushes Can Talk

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We help our kids brush their teeth at least two times a day, every day. We use the ever-reliable, handy-dandy toothbrush for it yet seldom do we pay attention to the brush itself. But do you know your child’s toothbrush can give you clues about his or her dental condition whenever it is being used? Here is some interesting information that your child’s toothbrush may be trying to tell you.

“Hold Off On The Sweets”

Sugary treats and candies can leave small particles or residue in your child’s mouth every time they are eaten. And usually, you will know this through the colorful dye that sticks to the toothbrush after its use. This colorful dye forms into sugar and acids that can cause plaque build-up and cavity-causing bacteria, eventually damaging your child’s teeth.

To avoid this, we recommend that you lessen your child’s intake of candies and other sweets. Give them snacks that are healthy and teeth-friendly, such as veggie sticks and cheese. If your child cannot resist a candy, allow him or her to have it after a meal as this is the time when your child’s mouth has lots of salivae to help wash away the acids and sugar. Better yet, let your child drink a glass of water after and brush his or her teeth as soon as possible.

“Your child has a gum problem”

Traces of blood on your child’s toothbrush, as well as swollen gums, may signal a gum problem. Also known as gingivitis, this oral problem is usually painless yet when left untreated, can lead to tooth loss. Hence, brush and floss your child’s teeth daily. Eating a healthy, balanced diet with low sugar and having proper dental hygiene can also help combat gingivitis. Moreover, we advise that your child visits his or her dentist for a cleaning and proper check-up of the teeth and gums.

“It’s time to say goodbye”

Toothbrushes are to be replaced every three months. However, in reality, we forget to do so, causing worn-out bristles and inefficient brushing. It may even be harder to let go for kids since it maybe your child’s favorite character toothbrush or one that lights up every time your child uses it. But make no mistakes, soon as it is more than 3 months old, replace it right away. In addition, remember to throw out your child’s toothbrush after he or she catches a cold or flu, to avoid contamination and reinfection. As a simple tip, and if you can, try to write on your child’s toothbrush the date of its first use so that you are reminded as to when to discard it.

“I need some tender love and care”

Toothbrushes need to be taken cared of and stored properly. Otherwise, it can be a breeding ground for disease-causing bacteria and other microorganisms. Sometimes, we put our child’s toothbrush in a plastic container to protect it from this concern but actually, we are causing more harm. The plastic toothbrush cover makes the bristles more damp and dry longer, giving the opportunity for germs to grow quickly and become stinky.

We recommend that you leave your child’s toothbrush to dry out in the open, and somewhere not near the toilet. Instead of covering it, you can rinse it with water to remove any residue and store it upright to dry. Rinse it with water again or perhaps, wash it with an antibacterial mouthwash before you let your child reuse it.

Funny as it may sound, toothbrushes play an essential role in your child’s overall oral health. But as it plays its part in taking care of your child’s teeth, know the ways to also take care of it. Just like your child’s dentist here in Kidsmile, we know your child’s dental and overall health is your priority too.

Sources:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/toothbrushes

https://www.lifehack.org/431796/8-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-toothbrushes

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