Eruption Of Child’s Teeth

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Understanding the normal cycle of your child’s teeth eruption and falling out will help you make sure that their dental health is right where it should be. Eruption refers to the tooth breaking through the gum line. In babies, the eruption is also called teething. The timing of tooth eruption is different from one child to another. We don’t usually think of a newborn as having teeth. The 20 “baby” or primary teeth are almost entirely formed at birth, hidden from our view in an infant’s jawbones. The primary or baby teeth gradually erupt during the first 2 ½ years of life.

While the timing may vary, this is the order of tooth eruption in babies:

  • 6 – 10 months: two front teeth or the central incisors comes in the lower jaw
  • 8 – 23 months: two front teeth or the central incisors comes in the upper jaw
  • 8 – 16 months: the lateral incisors or the teeth beside the two front teeth erupt in both upper and lower jaw. Usually, the lower set of teeth tends to erupt before the upper set.
  • 13 – 19 months: the first set of upper and lower molars or the flat-surfaced back teeth
  • 16 – 23 months: canine teeth
  • 25 – 33 months: the second set of upper and lower molars

Generally, a child will get their full set of 20 primary teeth by the age of three.

When babies are around six months of age, the level of antibodies passed on by their moms starts to fall. By this time, the immune system also changes along with the tendency to put everything in their mouth, which makes them prone to illness.

Teething takes about eight days, including four days before and three days after the tooth comes through the gum. During this time, it is tough to keep your child comfortable. Some parents often mistakenly linked symptoms of illness to teething, such as changes in sleep and eating patterns, fussiness, rash, diarrhea, and drooling. However, these may also be causes of bacterial, viral, or ear infections, so be sure to take extra care of your children at these times.

Around the age of five, the body will prepare for the next stage of teeth. The jaw and facial bones begin to grow to accommodate a more extensive set of adult teeth. By six years old, the child may start to lose their first tooth. Just as before, there is an order in which teeth are lost and replaced by adult teeth.

The timeline for permanent tooth eruption are as follows:

  • 6 – 7 years old: first molars
  • 6 – 8 years old: central incisors or two front teeth
  • 7 – 8 years old: lateral incisors or teeth beside the two front teeth
  • 9 – 13 years old: canine teeth, molars
  • 17 – 21 years old: wisdom tooth or teeth

Even though primary teeth will be replaced by adult teeth, it is still essential to take good care of them as primary teeth play a vital role in the body. These functions include reserving space for permanent teeth, helping shape the face, assisting in proper speech, safeguarding good nutrition, and providing a healthy foundation for permanent teeth.

Taking care of your child’s teeth from day one is vital to ensure optimal health for decades. It is advised that children must visit they are pediatric before the age of 2 and regularly after that for good oral health.

We, at Kidsmile, are passionately dedicated to providing quality dental care for your child. Our goal is to partner with you to help your child establish and achieve excellent oral health.

You can message us here or via our social media accounts for an initial consultation or in booking your appointment.

Sources:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/infant-kids/primary-dentition-baby-teeth-0117

https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/publications/Files/patient_56.pdf

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