Surprising Reasons for your Child’s Bad Breath

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Bad breath or halitosis is usually caused by proteins broken down in the mouth. Other culprits include poor dental hygiene, dry mouth, disease, infection, and dieting, among others. 

Having bad breath can be embarrassing for children. Teaching your children good oral hygiene and having them brush their teeth is a great way to fight bad breath. Take note though that bad breath or halitosis is not always an oral health issue. It is important to know the underlying cause of halitosis for proper treatment and overall good oral health. 

To help you with this, Kidsmile compiled some of the surprising reasons for your child’s bad breath and how to stop them:

1. Sinus Infection

Sinus infection can cause fluid to accumulate in the nasal passages and throat, making your child’s throat the perfect place for bacteria to gather. This results to having bad breath that can’t be cured with toothbrushing and mouthwash alone. If you suspect a sinus infection (potential sore throat, burning nasal passages and postnasal drip), call your pediatric dentist for a visit and see if antibiotics will be prescribed.

2. Tonsilitis

Another possible cause of halitosis in children is tonsillitis. When your child’s airway is constricted, he or she is more likely to breathe through the mouth. When the tissues in your child’s mouth dry out, bacteria will grow and increase in potency. If you notice symptoms of tonsillitis in your child such as a fever, swollen throat, has trouble swallowing, chills, or congestion, get your little one to treatment right away.

3. Mouth infection

If your child’s teeth or gums are infected and left untreated, bad breath will develop. Infection can happen due to the lack of brushing and flossing, which can lead to gum disease or cavities. If cavities are left untreated, they can develop a strong, noticeable odor. If you think your child has an infection or cavity, contact your pediatric dentist and schedule an appointment.

4. Food stuck in the mouth

Another reason for halitosis may be from certain pungent food your child eats, or bacteria built up on the tongue. Make sure your child brushes and flosses thoroughly every day. Some mouthwashes may be beneficial for your child to alleviate bad breath caused by leftover bacteria in the mouth. Other ways of treating halitosis can vary, based on the cause of the problem.

If you’re in doubt about why your child has chronic bad breath, it is best to contact your pediatric dentist so they can trace or examine where the issue originated. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that bad breath is the result of your kids skipping the most important part of their usual bedtime routine. Even with regular brushing, other types of bad breath can make bedtime stories unpleasant. Do some research and hone in on the cause of the issue and take the appropriate action. 


Sources:
Children and Halitosis | Pediatric Dental World
5 Surprising Reasons for Bad Breath in Children | Colgate 

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