What Parents Ought To Know About Pediatric Dental X-Rays

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When we talk about X-rays, one of the first things that come to mind is radiation exposure. Because of that concern, many parents are usually hesitant in letting their children undergo X-ray imaging. Unless parents are well-informed about the procedure and the need to do so, they will generally have doubts about it.

In the medical field, x-rays are considered as important diagnostic equipment. The same is true in dentistry. Your pediatric dentist uses x-rays to further examine your child’s teeth, look for any dental problem that may be present, and evaluate its extent.

The use of dental X-rays, or dental radiographs, is an important step in your child‘s dental treatment and care. Dental x-rays assist your child’s dentist to look for and examine any possible dental issue that your child may have before it becomes serious. Areas such as your child’s gums and back teeth cannot be easily examined in an oral check-up. Depth of tooth decay, missing unerupted teeth, and jaw bone anomalies are just some of the oral issues that a dental x-ray can see and identify. The utilization of dental x-rays then becomes a requirement in order for your child’s dentist to have a better evaluation of his or her overall oral health. In general, children undergo dental x-rays every one to two years.

As a parent, you are concerned about the health risk that a dental x-ray may pose to your child. However, studies show that it is not something that you should worry about.

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, dental x-rays are safe and the amount of radiation that your child receives during a dental x-ray procedure is extremely small.

More so, modern x-ray equipment is now digital and even allow dentists to focus the device on a targeted area to lessen the radiation exposure all the more. Your child may also be given a

lead apron and a thyroid collar that act as shields during dental x-ray procedure for added protection and further reduce the radiation exposure to almost nothing.

For the most part, proper oral hygiene and dental care can help you and child lessen the need for dental x-rays. If your child shows a reduced risk of tooth decay or any other dental problem, he or she will not need to undergo frequent dental x-rays. So it is essential that you encourage your child to take care of his or her teeth through regular brushing and flossing, along with healthy eating habits.

Talk to your child’s dentist on your next visit if you still have some anxiety on the use of dental x-rays as part of your child’s oral care. Your pediatric dentist will surely appreciate it.


Sources:

X-rays For Children, Colgate.com (https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/procedures/x-rays/x-rays-for-children)

Xrays, MouthHealthy.org by American Dental Association (https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/x/x-rays)

What You Should Know About Dental Xrays, VeryWellHealth.com (https://www.verywellhealth.com/all-about-dental-x-rays-1058980)

Dental Radiographs Benefits and Safety, American Dental Association Magazine, September 2011 (https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/for_the_dental_patient_sept_2011.pdf?la=en)

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