Your Quick Guide: Dental Fillings For Kids

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on whatsapp
Share on skype
Share on telegram
Share on xing

Here at Kidsmile, one of the primary goals of your child’s dentists is to help prevent your child from developing cavities and tooth decays. As you know, children’s teeth, or baby teeth in general, are more permeable and softer than adult teeth. Because of these characteristics, baby teeth are more prone to cavities and tooth decay. When decay develops in your child’s tooth, that specific part of the tooth will need to be removed. This needs to be done to stop the decay from making any further damage to the tooth.

Regularly visiting your child’s dentist is key. By regularly visiting the dentist, we can examine your child’s teeth and overall dental progress. And if there are signs of initial tooth decay, the dentist can treat them early on. However, if your child develops cavities, a restorative treatment called dental filling may be performed. Dentists use fillings as the primary treatment because through dental fillings, the tooth structure can be restored to its original look, shape, and size.

Getting dental fillings as a treatment is relatively faster compared to other dental treatments. The actual procedure and recovery process for children is similar to that of adult patients. Dental fillings are not painful but the thought of getting one can make your child nervous and uneasy. The treatment requires a patient to sit still and this may pose a challenge to younger patients. That is why the pediatric dentist may recommend the use of sedation. The use of nitrous oxide as a sedation tool may be helpful to make your child more at ease and relaxed during the procedure. Do not worry as sedating your child is something that will be discussed with you by your pediatric dentist before the treatment.

After sedation, the dentist will numb the specific tooth and gum area and remove the decayed portion. Then, the dentist will clean and dry the area before depositing the filling.

For the dental fillings that will be put in, your child can have either an amalgam filling or a composite filling. An amalgam filling is the more common silver-colored filling that we are accustomed too. However, silver fillings are noticeable and they tarnish. A composite filling is the tooth-colored filling that is more natural-looking and less noticeable. Both fillings work the same but composite fillings provide better oral aesthetics for your child.

Remember that tooth decay, if left untreated, can cause more problems and health issues to your child. Tooth decay can cause severe toothache and infection, permanent damage to the tooth, or even tooth loss. Socially, it can cause your child to be absent in school due to pain, poor sleep, and even speech problems.

Together, let us help your child have a healthy smile. Teach them proper oral hygiene and healthy eating. Simple steps like these will surely go a long way in establishing healthier and stronger teeth for your child.

Sources:

Health Effects of Dental Fillings in Children, National Institutes of Health https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/health-effects-dental-fillings-children

Fillings in Baby Teeth: Are They Really Necessary?, Colgate https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/infant-kids/fillings-in-baby-teeth-are-they-really-necessary

What is a Filling?, Colgate https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/procedures/fillings/what-is-a-filling

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on whatsapp
Share on skype
Share on telegram
Share on xing